Science faculty in the College of Pharmacy draw on knowledge from many fields, including chemistry, molecular biology, and physics, to engage in research that is directly applicable to the discovery and development of pharmaceutical agents designed to treat illness and improve patient quality of life. Research work by our pharmaceutical sciences faculty is presented at national meetings and published in prominent research journals.  Students who participate in laboratory research with science faculty have the opportunity to further develop their critical and independent thinking skills and experience the thrill that comes with discovering something new and sharing it with others.

Researchers

Name Research Areas
Dr. Arup Chakraborty, PhD
Associate Professor of Pharmacy
College of Pharmacy
702-968-2014
achakraborty@roseman.edu
Dr. Chakraborty received his MS in Biological Sciences and Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. After completion of his degree he was appointed as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh. Dr. Chakraborty appointed as a tenure track Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine and as an adjunct faculty in the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. After that he joined as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Experimental Therapeutics at MD Anderson Cancer center, Houston. Currently, Dr. Chakraborty is an Assistant Professor in the College of Pharmacy at the Roseman University of Health Sciences where he has been a faculty member since 2009. His research interests are focused on the signal transduction pathways involved in carcinogenesis and inflammation. In particular his laboratory is currently working on understanding the role of oncogenic JAK/STAT pathways in various neoplasia and natural inhibitors that block these pathways. Dr. Chakraborty published 28 articles in various international journals and received multiple federal research funding.
Publications

  • Arup Chakraborty, Scott White and Seth Lerner. 2004. G-CSFR Signals for beta1-Integrin Expression and Adhesion in Bladder Cancer. Urology, 63(1):177-83.
  • Arup Chakraborty, Scott M. White and Sushovan Guha. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and G-CSFR autocrine loop promotes invasion of bladder cancer cells. Urology. 68: 208-13, 2006.
  • Chakraborty A, Brooks HL, Zhang P, Smith W, McReynolds M, Hoying J, Bick RJ, Truong L, Poindexter B, Lan H, Elbjeirami W, Sheikh-Hamad D. Stanniocalcin-1 regulates endothelial gene expression and modulates trans-endothelial migration of leukocytes. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2006 Oct 10.
  • Ashutosh K. Pathak , Manisha Bhutani, Asha S. Nair, Kwang Seok Ahn, Arup Chakraborty, Sushovan Guha, Gautam Sethi, and Bharat B. Aggarwal. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Proliferation, Induces Apoptosis and Chemosensitizes Human Multiple Myeloma Cells By Inhibiting Constitutive and IL-6 Inducible STAT3 Activation Pathway. Mol Cancer Res. 2007 Sep; 5(9):943-55.
  • Arup Chakraborty, and Sushovan Guha. G-CSF/G-CSFR Biological Axis Promotes Survival and Growth of Bladder Cancer Cells. Urology.  2007 Jun; 69(6):1210-5.
  • Ling-Yuan Kong, Mohamed K. Abou-Ghazal, Jun Wei, Arup Chakraborty, Wei Sun, Wei Qiao, Gregory N. Fuller, Izabela Fokt, Elizabeth A. Grimm, Robert J. Schmittling, Gary E. Archer Jr., John H. Sampson, Waldemar Priebe, and Amy B. Heimberger. A Novel Inhibitor of STAT3 Activation Is Efficacious Against Established Central Nervous System Melanoma and Inhibits Regulatory T Cells. Clin. Cancer. Res. 2008, Sep 15;14(18):5759-68.
  • Z Tong, AB Kunnumakkara, H Wang, Y Matsuo, P Diagaradjane, KB Harikumar, V Ramachandran, B Sung, A Chakraborty, C Logsdon, BB Aggarwal, S Krishnan, and S Guha. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin: A Novel Suppressor of Invasion and Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer. 2008, Cancer Res. Aug 1; 68(15):6100-8.
  • Zhaolu Kong, Daxing Xie, Thomas Boike, Pavithra Rabhavan, Sandeep Burma, David Chen, Amyn Habib, Arup Chakraborty, Jer-Tsong Hsieh, and Debabrata Saha. Down-regulation of Human DAB2IP Gene Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells Exhibit Resistance to Ionizing radiation. 2010, Cancer Res. 2010 Apr 1;70(7):2829-39.
  • Zhaolu Kong, Daxing Xie, Thomas Boike, Pavithra Raghavan, Sandeep Burma, David Chen, Arup Chakraborty, Jer-Tsong Hsieh, and Debabrata Saha. Epothilone B confers radiation dose enhancement in DAB2IP gene knock down radio-resistant prostate cancer cells. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Nov 15;78(4):1210-8.
  • Jessica E. Jorvig and Arup Chakraborty. Zerumbone inhibits growth of hormone refractory prostate cancer cells by inhibiting JAK2/STAT3 pathway and increases paclitaxel sensitivity. 2015, Anti-cancer drugs, Feb; 26(2):160-6.
Cancer
Cell signaling
JAK/STAT pathway
Zerumbone
Molecular biology
Current Research Interests/Projects
Despite the development of new therapies, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the USA and accounts for nearly one in every four deaths. Many plant-derived dietary agents, called nutraceuticals, have phenomenal anti-cancer properties. These nutraceuticals are safer, less expensive and more readily available than are synthetic agents. Some nutraceuticals are currently in clinical trials, and others have already been approved for human use. My current research interest is screening drugs from nutraceuticals. We have shown that a phytochemical from ginger is a novel JAK/STAT pathway inhibitor and validated in vitro in pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and ovarian cancer.

  1. This compound successfully inhibits growth and migration of cancer cells.
  2. It is a novel inhibitor of a signaling cascade that leads to development of cancer.
  3. This compound significantly increases the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells.

Currently we are designing in vivo animal cancer model to test the effectiveness of phytochemicals. Our future goal is to evaluate selected nutraceuticals for their anti-inflammatory properties.

Dr. Surajit Dey, PhD
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
702-968-2056
sdey@roseman.edu
Dr. Surajit Dey is an Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Roseman University of Health Sciences. Dr. Dey received his Bachelor’s in Pharmacy in 1997 and his Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Missouri, Kansas City in 2004. He has been a faculty member since 2004 and currently teaches Pharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics in the PharmD curriculum. Dr. Dey’s primary research interests are in the areas of ocular drug delivery and wound healing focusing on novel treatment options for age-related macular degeneration. Dr. Dey is very active in both university-level and college-level committees and is the current president of the University Faculty Senate and faculty advisor to the University Student Government Association. Dr. Dey is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles and serves as an assistant editor of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacology
Journals

  • Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (IOVS)Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (JPS)

Additional Links
www.arvo.org
nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen

Ocular diseases
Macular Degeneration
Stress and Quality of Life
Drug Delivery
Pharmacokinetics
Current Research Interests/Projects
My current research projects are focused on finding novel therapeutic strategies for age related macular degeneration. The goal is to enable the restoration of vision through regeneration of the retina. In addition, we are looking at drug delivery strategies for sight threatening diseases.
Dr. Vijay Kale, BPharm, MPharm, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
801-878-1078
vkale@roseman.edu
Dr. Kale received B.S. & M.S. in Pharmacy from University of Pune, India & Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University, Pune, India respectively. In 2007 Dr. Kale received a Ph.D. degree in Pharmacology & Toxicology from the University of Louisiana at Monroe. Dr. Kale worked as a postdoctoral fellow at University of Connecticut, School of Pharmacy (2008-09) & at Medical University of South Carolina (2009-10). In 2010, Dr. Kale joined Roseman University of Health Sciences where he currently serves as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences. He is an active member of several organizations including the Society of Toxicology, the American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics, the American Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. His research interests include development of natural product therapeutics based on mitochondrial biogenesis for the treatment & prevention of diabetes and aging; role of metabolism & tissue repair in toxicity, understanding mechanism behind gingival hyperplasia and therapeutic strategies to treat it.
Publications

  • Zhang J, Kale VM, Chen M (2015), Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy; The AAPS Journal, 17 (1): 102-110.
  • Jaligama S, Kale VM, Wilbanks MS, Perkins EJ and Meyer SA (2013), Delayed myelosupression with acute exposure to hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and environmental degradation product hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-tirazine (MNX) in rats; Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 266(3):443-51.
  • Kale VM, Hsiao CJ and Boelsterli UA (2010), Nimesulide-induced electrophilic stress activates Nrf2 in human hepatocytes and mice but is not sufficient to induce hepatotoxicity in Nrf2-deficient mice; Chem. Res. Toxicol, 23(5): 967-976.
  • Kashimshetty R, Desai VG, Kale VM, Lee T, Moland CL, Branham WS, New LS, Chan EC, Younis H and Boelsterli UA (2009), Underlying mitochondrial dysfunction triggers flutamide-induced oxidative liver injury in a mouse model of idiosyncratic drug toxicity; Toxicol Appl  Pharmacol 238 (2): 150-159.
  • Kale VM, Miranda SR, Wilbanks MS and Meyer SA (2008), Comparative cytotoxicity of alachlor, acetochlor and metolachlor herbicides in isolated rat and cryopreserved human hepatocytes; J Bio Mol Toxicol 22 (1): 41-50.
  • Kale VM, Talekar RS and Dhake AS (2000), Simultaneous determination of pseudoephidrine hydrochloride and ibuprofen from combined dosage forms by UV-spectrophotometry; East Pharm. 43 (514): 115-118.
  • Kale VM and Radhakrishnan J (2014). Evaluation of Cell Viability and Mitochondrial Protective Effects of Quercetin in Rat L6 Cells. The Toxicologist 138 (1), Abstract # 797 P 205.
  • Jaligama S, Kale VM, Wilbanks MS, Perkins EJ and Meyer SA (2013). Bone marrow inflammation precedes hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-trazine (MNX) induced delayed myelosuppression  in rats. The FASEB Journal; 27:888.5
  • Jaligama S, Kale VM, Wilbanks MS, Perkins EJ and Meyer SA (2013). Effect of bone marrow inflammation in hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) induced myelosupression in rats; The Toxicologist 132 (1), Abstract # 250.
  • Jaligama S, Kale VM, Wilbanks MS, Perkins EJ and Meyer SA (2012). Early hematological effects of hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), environmental degradation product of RDX, persist to cause delayed myelosuppression in rats, International Journal of Toxicology, 32 (1): 76, P402.
Diabetes
Toxicology
Mitochondria
Metabolism
Gingival diseases
Current Research Interests/Projects
Research project 1: Understand the mechanism behind drug induced gingival hyperplasia and therapeutic strategies to treat it. This project currently involves the use of human gingival fibroblast cells and nifedipine and phenytoin as tools to induce gingival hyperplasia.
Research project 2: Natural product screens for the treatment of diabetes based on mitochondrial biogenesis using rat L6 cells.This project involves the use of muscle cells (Rat L6) to screen various chemical from ethnopharmacology that have been shown to possess anti-diabetic activity. Mitochondrial mRNA expression and mitochondrial copy number are some of the parameters we use to ascertain mitochondrial biogenesis. Projects ultimate goal is to screen number of chemical and identify core chemical structure that can be further used for drug design.
Research project 3: Pirfenadone metabolism and pharmaceutical drug interactions using human liver microsomes. Pirfenadone has been recently approved by US FDA for treatment of cystic fibrosis. Pirfenadone is primarily metabolized by CYP1A2 (~70-80%) and rest being through other CYP enzymes. Number of pharmaceutical drugs has potential drug interaction with pirfenadone.  Goal of the project is to identify commonly used drugs in cystic fibrosis and their metabolism based drug interaction with pirfenadone.
Dr. Manas Mandal, MSc, PhD
Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy
Adjunct Faculty, College of Dental Medicine, College of Medicine
702-968-1610
mmandal@roseman.edu
Dr. Mandal received Bachelors (honours) and Masters degree in Human Physiology from the University of Calcutta, India. Afterwards he earned a Ph.D. degree from the Jadavpur University, Calcutta in 1992 working on snake venom vaccine development project at the Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology. Post-doctoral research in cellular immunology was done at the Gwen Knapp Center for Lupus and Immunology Research, University of Chicago and University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. At the University of Michigan worked on a listeriolysin-O containing liposome vaccine delivery system  targeting MHC-I pathway of antigen processing to prime a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response using murine tumor and viral infection models. Dr. Mandal joined Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy in 2006 as an assistant professor to coordinate and teach immunology course for the PharmD students. He also teaches immunology to the students of Roseman University College of Dental Medicine and Orthodontics Residency Program. Dr. Mandal is an adjunct faculty at the Roseman University College of Medicine the and at the Touro University of Nevada where he teaches in Physicians’ Assistant Program and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine program. He taught a course in applied immunology and immunopathology to the PharmD students of Ohio Northern University as a guest faculty. He is an active member of American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and serves Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education and National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. His current research interest includes detection of salivary biomarker in orthodontics patients, use of bacterial toxin in vaccine delivery, marine toxin in drug discovery,drug-induced immune modulation and educational research. Dr. Mandal has published in major journals in toxinology, immunology and drug delivery. He also serves as a reviewer of journals, grants and abstracts for professional societies. Dr. Mandal gave invited talks and presentations in US and abroad and chaired scientific sessions. Dr. Mandal lives in Henderson, NV with his wife and two young daughters. He likes to spend time with his family, and enjoys photography, gardening, hiking and traveling.
Curriculum Vitae
Publications

  • Li, J*., Ryder C*., Mandal, M*., Ahmed, F., Azadi, P., Snyder, D. S,. Pechous, R. R,. Zahrt, T., and Thomas J. Inzana. 2007. Attenuation and protective efficacy of an O-antigen-deficient mutant of Francisella tularensis LVS. Microbiology, 153: 3143-3155. * Equal contribution.
  • Mandal, M., Kawamura, K., Wherry, E.J., Ahmed, R. and Lee K. -D. 2004.  Cytosolic delivery of viral nucleoprotein by listeriolysin O-liposome induces enhanced specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response and protective immunity. Molecular Pharmaceutics. 1: 2-8.
  • Stier, E., Mandal, M. and Lee, K. -D. 2004.  Differential cytosolic delivery and presentation of antigen by listeriolysin O-liposomes to macrophages and dendritic cells.  Molecular Pharmaceutics. 2: 74-82.
  • Mandal, M. and Lee, K. -D. 2002.  Listeriolysin O-liposome-mediated cytosolic delivery of macromolecule antigen in vivo: Enhancement of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte frequency, activity, and tumor protection. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1563: 7-17.
  • Mandal, M., Mathew E., Provoda C., and Lee, K. -D. 2003.  Delivery of macromolecules into cytosol using liposomes containing hemolysin.  Methods in Enzymology 372 (Ch. 18): 319-339.
  • Chiu, N. M., Chun, T., Fay, M., Mandal, M. and Wang, C.-R. 1999.  The majority of H2-M3 is retained intracellularly in a peptide-receptive state and traffic to the cell surface in the presence of N-formylated peptides. J. Exp. Med. 190: 423-434.
  • Mandal, M., Chen, X.-R., Alegre, M-L., Chiu, N. M., Chen, Y.-H., Castano, A.R. and Wang, C.-R. 1998. Tissue distribution, regulation and intracellular localization of murine CD1 molecules. Mol. Immunol. 35: 525-536.
  • Chen, Y. -H., Chiu, N. M., Mandal, M., Wang, N. and Wang, C.-R. 1997.  Impaired NK+ T cell development and early IL-4 production in CD1
  • Pore-forming Bacterial Toxins in Health and Disease. Invited seminar at the 3rd Annual Conference of the Toxinological Society of India and 1st International Conference on ‘Biology of Natural Toxins’. Birla Institute of Science and Technology, Goa, Dec 19-21, 2013.
  • Biologicals in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Roundtable session, AACP annual meeting 2014, July 27 Grapevine, TX.

Awards & Honors

  • Senior research fellowship,1989-1992:Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India
  • Best research poster award, 1998: American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Annual meeting
  • Upjohn and Vahlteich research award, 200-2004:UM COP
  • Intramural research grant, 2007-208:University of Southern Nevada

Memberships & Appointments

  • American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists
  • American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
  • American Association of Immunologists
  • American Association of Advancement of Science
Salivary biomarker
Vaccine
Immune-based therapeutics
Drug induced immune modulation
Knowledge retention
Current Research Interests/Projects
1. Detection of salivary for assessment of skeletal maturation in orthodontics patients.
2. Drug-induced immune modulation.
3. Vaccine delivery system.
4. Educational research in knowledge retention, faculty perception on research.
Dr. David Rawlins, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
702-968-1684
drawlins@roseman.edu
Dr. David Rawlins received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University following his earning a M.S. in chemistry and a B.S. in microbiology from Brigham Young University. After graduation, he joined Bristol-Myers Squibb as a medicinal chemist working on drugs to treat oncology and immunology diseases. After eight years at BMS, he joined Lexicon Pharmaceuticals researching drugs to treat diseases in oncology, metabolic disease, and ophthalmology. Before joining Roseman University of Health Sciences he was an Executive Director of Medicinal Chemistry and led both chemistry research teams as well as the cheminformatics group. His interests range from traditional medicinal chemistry, including structure-based drug design and combinatorial library synthesis, to building software tools to aid pharmaceutical research including chemical tracking and SAR analysis. His work has resulted in 15 journal articles, 16 patents, and three drugs that have entered human clinical trials.
Publications & Presentations

  • Goodwin, Nicole C.; Cianchetta, G.; Burgoon, H. A.; Healy, J.; Mabon, R.; Strobel, E. D.; Allen, J.; Wang, S.; Hamman, B. L.; Rawlins, D. B. Discovery of a Type III Inhibitor of LIM Kinase 2 That Binds in a DFG-Out Conformation. Med. Chem. Lett. 2015, 6, 53-57.
  • Harrison, B. A.; Almstead, Z. Y.; Burgoon, H.; Gardyan, M.; Goodwin, N. C.; Healy, J.; Liu, Y.; Mabon, R.; Marinelli, B.; Samala, L.; Zhang, Y.; Stouch, T.; Whitlock, N. A.; Hamman, B. D.; Gopinathan, S.; McKnight, B.; Crist, M.; Wang, S.; Patel, N.; Wilson, A. G. E.; Rice, D. S.; Rawlins, D. B. The Discovery and Development of LX7101, a LIM-Kinase 2 Inhibitor for the Treatment of Glaucoma. Med. Chem. Lett. 2015, 6, 84–88.
  • Hargiss, L. O.; Zipp, G. G.; Jessop, T. C.; Sun, X.; Keyes, P.; Rawlins, D. B.; Liang, Z.; Park, K. J.;Gu, H. Reaction Profiling by Ultra High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry in Support of the Synthesis of DNA-Encoded Libraries. J. Chrom. B 2014, 971, 120-125.
  • Zambrowicz, B.; Freiman, J.; Brown, P. M.; Frazier, K. S.; Turnage, A.; Bronner, J.; Ruff, D.; Shadoan, M.; Banks, P.; Mseeh, F.; Rawlins, D. B.; Goodwin, N. C.; Mabon, R.; Harrison, B. A.; Wilson, A.; Sands, A.; Powell, D. R. LX4211, a Dual SGLT1/SGLT2 Inhibitor, Improved Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 2012, 92, 158-169.
  • Rawlins, D. B.; Frazier, K. S.; Freiman, J.; Goodwin, N. C.; Harrison, B. A.; Healy, J.; Mabon, R.; Powell, D. R. Discovery and development of LX4211, a dual inhibitor of SGLT1 and SGLT2 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Abstracts of Papers, 243rd ACS National Meeting & Exposition, San Diego, CA, United States, March 25-29, 2012; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 2012; MEDI-19.
  • Harrison, B. A.; Whitlock, N. A.; Voronkov, M. V.; Almstead, Z. Y.; Gu, K.-J.; Mabon, R.; Gardyan, M.; Hamman, B. D.; Allen, J.; Gopinathan, S.; McKnight, B.; Crist, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Courtney, L. F.; Key, B.; Zhou, J.; Patel, N.; Yates, P. W.; Liu, Q.; Wilson, A. G. E.; Kimball, S. D.; Crosson, C. E.; Rice, D. S.; Rawlins, D. B. Novel Class of LIM-Kinase 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Ocular Hypertension and Associated Glaucoma. J. Med. Chem. 2009, 52, 6515-6518.
  • Goodwin, N. C.; Mabon, R.; Harrison, B. A.; Shadoan, M. K.; Almstead, Z. Y.; Xie, Y.; Healy, J.; Buhring, L. M.; DaCosta, C. M.; Bardenhagen, J.; Mseeh, F.; Liu, Q.; Nouraldeen, A.; Wilson, A. G. E.; Kimball, S. D.; Powell, D. R.; Rawlins, D. B. Novel L-Xylose Derivatives as Selective Sodium-Dependent Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes. J. Med. Chem. 2009, 52, 6201-6204.
  • Misra, R. N.; Kim, K. S.; Hunt, J. T.; Rawlins, D. B.; Pavletich, N. P.; Lee, F. Y. F.; Webster, K. R.; Kimball, S. D.; et al. N-(Cycloalkylamino)acyl-2-aminothiazole Inhibitors of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2. N-[5-[[[5-(1,1- Dimethylethyl)-2-oxazolyl]methyl]thio]-2-thiazolyl]-4-piperidinecarboxamide (BMS-387032), a Highly Efficacious and Selective Antitumor Agent. J. Med. Chem. 2004, 47, 1719-1728.
  • Misra, R. N.; Xiao, H.; Rawlins, D. B.; Shan, W.; Keller, K. A.; Mulheron, J. G.; Sack, J. S.; Tokarski, J. S.; Kimball, S. D.; Webster, K. R. 1H-Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine Inhibitors of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases. Highly Potent 2,6-Difluoro-phenacyl Analogues. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Letters 2003, 13, 2405-2408.
  • Kim, K. S.; Kimball, S. D.; Misra, R. N.; Webster, K. R.; Rawlins, D. B.; et al. Discovery of Aminothiazole Inhibitors of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2: Synthesis, X-ray Crystallographic Analysis, and Biological Activities. J. Med. Chem. 2002, 45, 3905-3927.

Memberships & Appointments

  • American Chemical Society
Chemistry
Kinase
Cancer
Diabetes
Antiviral
Current Research Interests/Projects
Dr. Rawlins’ research interests include designing and synthesizing small molecules which interact with biological targets, with the ultimate goal of finding new treatments for human disease. He has a special interest in kinases which play major roles in not only cell division, but also vast signaling pathways. In addition, he is interested in using combinatorial chemistry methodology to make small libraries of compounds using water as the solvent.
Dr. Krystal Riccio, PharmD, BCACP

Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
College of Pharmacy
702-968-5582
kriccio@roseman.edu
Dr. Riccio is an Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice with Roseman University of Health Sciences. She completed an ambulatory care intensive pharmacy practice residency at the VA Southern Nevada Health Care System, and in 2011, received Board Certification in Ambulatory Care (BCACP).  Dr. Riccio currently practices within University Medical Center Primary Care Clinics, where she precepts student pharmacists.  Her practice specializes in diabetes and obesity management with extensive patient education and training in lifestyle modification.  Dr.  Riccio is involved in a number of state level strategic planning committees, including the Diabetes Educators Strategic Planning Committee, Heart & Stroke Prevention Task Force, and Prescription Drug Abuse Task Force. Through these committees, she has been able to represent and promote pharmacists involvement in a team-based care model, raise awareness for provider status legislation, and educate state leaders on the value-based care pharmacist provide.  She is also very involved in her community, coaching for an all-inclusive exceptional children’s soccer league, donating time with Volunteers of Medicine of Southern Nevada, and advising student organizations: including the Drug Abuse Awareness Team (DAAT) and National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA).  Dr. Riccio is currently conducting educational research surrounding pharmacy student assessment and is pursuing behavioral science research surrounding adolescent drug use.

Memberships & Appointments

  • Nevada Health-systems Pharmacist Association (Education Committee)
  • National Governors Association Policy Accademy: NV Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Logic Modeling Team
  • Nevada Heart and Stroke Prevention Task Force
  • Nevada Diabetes Educators Stakeholders
  • American College of Clinical Pharmacists (Endocrine & Ambulatory Care PRN)
  • American Pharmacists Association
Current Research Interests/Projects

  1. Ongoing: Evaluating student success and confidence surrounding Choose All That Apply (CATA) style questions in a pharmacy education setting
  2. Planning Phase: Evaluating the behavior, motivations, and source for drug use/misuse within the adolescent population
Dr. Tyler Rose, PhD
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
801-302-2600
trose@roseman.edu

A graduate of Dixie College in St. George, Utah, Dr. Rose received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Southern Utah University and a Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry working in the Glenn Prestwich lab at the University of Utah.  He has been a faculty member at the Roseman University of Health Sciences (formerly the University of Southern Nevada) South Jordan, Utah campus since 2006, primarily teaching courses in the pharmacy program related to biochemistry, medicinal chemistry, and pharmaceutical calculations.  His service responsibilities have included work on the promotion committee, ACPE accreditation committee, faculty development committee, and laboratory safety committee.
Publications & Presentations

  • Rose, T.M.; Reilly C.; Deering-Rice, C.E.; Brewster, C.A.; Brewster C. “Inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2 by NSAID-Serotonin Conjugates.”  Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2014, 24(24), 5695-5698.
  • 2013 Annual ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists) Midyear Meeting, Orlando, Florida (Poster):  Rose, T.M.; McKay, A.; Boren, B. “Activation of the Anti-Diabetic Receptor GPR119 by Chemically Modified Fibrates and Pioglitazone.”
  • 243rd American Chemical Society National Meeting, San Diego, California (Poster):  Rose, T.M.; Williams, D.; Hansen, K.; McEwen, R.; Deval, E.; Lingueglia, E. “Inhibition of COX-2 and ASIC-3 by Structural Analogues of Diclofenac,” 25 March 2012.
  • Rose, T.M. “A Board Game to Assist Pharmacy Students in Learning Metabolic Pathways.”  American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 2011, 75(9), Article 183.

Recent Research Grants

  • 2015 AMA Foundation Healthy Living Grant
    • $8000 to develop an “Interactive Module to Halt Abuse of Prescription Drugs by Preteens and Youth (I’M HAPPY)”
  • 2009-2010 University of Southern Nevada Intramural Research Grant
    • $8000 for the “Synthesis and Evaluation of Potent, Subtype-Selective, and Drug-Like Antagonists of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels”
Lipids
Anxiety
Pain
Diabetes
NSAIDs
Current Research Interests/Projects
Dr. Rose’s laboratory research interests focus on designing drugs that affect the lipid signaling associated with pathological pain, anxiety, and metabolic disorders.  As an educational researcher, he is interested in creating interactive games and instructional modules that make learning more flexible, focused, and fun.
Dr. Casey Sayre, PharmD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
801-878-1126
csayre@roseman.edu
Dr. Casey Sayre graduated from Brigham Young University with a Bachelor of Science  degree in Biology in 2006. He continued his studies at the Idaho State University College of Pharmacy, completing a PharmD degree in 2010. He then commenced graduate studies at Washington State University and relocated with his supervisor to Canada, completing a PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Manitoba, Canada in 2015. He has also practiced pharmacy in hospital, community, and long term care settings.
Publications & Presentations

  • Sayre CL, Alrushaid S, Martinez SE, Anderson HD, Davies NM. Pre-clinical Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Characterization of Selected Chiral Flavonoids: Pinocembrin and Pinostrobin. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.
  • Sayre CL, Davies NM. Quantification of Three Chiral Flavonoids with Reported Bioactivity in Selected Licensed Canadian Natural Health Products and US Marketed Dietary Supplements. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2013. June;16(2):272-278.
  • Yang S, Chen Y, Gu K, Dash A, Sayre CL, Davies NM, Ho EA. Novel intravaginal nanomedicine for the targeted delivery of saquinavir to CD4(+) immune cells. Int  J Nanomedicine. 2013;8:2847-58.
  • Sayre CL, Hopkins M, Takemoto JK, Davies NM. Chiral analytical method development of liquiritigenin with application to a pharmacokinetic study. Biomed Chromatogr. 2013 Mar;27(3):404-6.
  • Sayre CL, Zhang Y, Martinez SE, Takemoto JK, Davies NM. Stereospecific analytical method development and preliminary in vivo pharmacokinetic characterization of pinostrobin in the rat. Biomed Chromatogr. 2013 May;27(5):548-50.
  • Sayre CL, Takemoto JK, Martinez SE, Davies NM. Chiral analytical method development and application to pre-clinical pharmacokinetics of pinocembrin. Biomed Chromatogr. 2013 Jun;27(6):681-4.
  • Martinez SE, Sayre CL, Davies NM. Pharmacometrics of 3-methoxypterostilbene: a component of traditional chinese medicinal plants. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:261468.
  • Martinez SE, Sayre CL, Davies NM. Analysis of 3-methoxypterostilbene in biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography: application to pre-clinical pharmacokinetics. Biomed Chromatogr. 2013 Jan;27(1):67-72.
  • Martinez SE, Sayre CL, Davies NM. Analysis of 3-methoxypterostilbene in biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography: application to pre-clinical pharmacokinetics. Biomed Chromatogr. 2013 Jan;27(1):67-72.
  • Yáñez JA, Remsberg CM, Sayre CL, Forrest ML, Davies NM. Flip-Flop Pharmacokinetics- Delivering a Reversal of Disposition: Challenges and Opportunities During Drug Development. Therapeutic Delivery 2011;2(5):643-672.

Awards & Honors

  • Duff Roblin Fellow – University of Manitoba
  • Award of Excellence – Washington State University
  • Iraq Campaign Medal – U.S. Army

Memberships & Appointments

  • American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)
  • American Society of Pharmacognosy (ASP)
  • American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)
  • AOAC International
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Utah
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Affiliate, Canadian Centre for Agri-Food Research in Health and Medicine
  • St. Boniface Hospital Research Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Pharmacokinetics
Pharmaceutics
Pharmacognosy
Compounding
Drug interactions
Current Research Interests/Projects
As a pharmacist and a pharmaceutical scientist, Dr. Sayre’s research interests are in optimizing and individualizing currently used and investigational pharmacotherapy with pharmaceutic, pharmacometric, and pharmacogenetic analysis and experimentation. Dr. Sayre collaborates with Dr. Yellepeddi on an expanding pharmaceutical compounding research program. The program is multi-pronged and includes projects in collaboration with several compounding pharmacies involving: the quantitative analysis of the potency and stability of sterile and non-sterile compounded pharmaceuticals, the clinical efficacy of compounded pharmaceuticals, and the optimization of compounded pharmaceutical formulation and production. Dr. Sayre also has particular interest in pharmacognosy – the study of drugs from natural sources. Areas of research include: botanical drug discovery, use, and analysis, as well as specialized plant metabolites and their interactions with pharmaceuticals and mammalian physiology. Projects include the pharmacokinetic characterization of novel specialized plant metabolite – drug conjugates, and the discovery and characterization of botanical pharmacoenhancers that could increase drug safety, efficacy, and adherence. Dr. Sayre also holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Utah and performs collaborative research there.
Dr. Christopher So, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
702-968-2011
cso@roseman.edu
I have a BSc in Toxicology and PhD in Pharmacology, both from the University of Toronto. I was a postdoctoral research fellow at Thomas Jefferson University (Philadelphia, PA) under the mentorship of Dr. Jeffrey Benovic. I have also worked as a scientist for small biotech companies.
Publications & Presentations

  • C.H. So, A.M. Michal, K. Komolov, J. Luo and J.L. Benovic (2013). G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) is Localized to Centrosomes and Mediates Epidermal Growth Factor-Promoted Centrosomal Separation. Molecular Biology of the Cell, Sep;24(18):2795-806.
  • A.M. Michal (co-primary author), C.H. So (co-primary author), N. Beeharry, H. Shankar, R. Mashayekhi, T.J. Yen, J.L. Benovic (2012). G Protein Coupled-Receptor Kinase 5 is Localized to Centrosomes and Regulates Cell Cycle Progression. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287(9):6928-40.
  • C.H. So,  A.M. Michal, R. Mashayekhi   and J.L. Benovic (2012). G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Phosphorylates Nucleophosmin and Regulates Cell Sensitivity to Polo-like Kinase 1 Inhibition. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287(21):17088-99.

Awards & Honors

  • 2008-2010 – Research Fellowship, Heart and Stroke – Foundation of Canada

Memberships & Appointments

  • Member, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
  • Member, American Heart Association
G protein coupled receptors
G protein coupled receptor kinases
Signal transduction
Drug development
Protein interactions
Current Research Interests/Projects
My research looks at identifying new G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways and new functions of G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). I use bioinformatics, in vitro, cellular and model organisms (the round worm Caenorhabditis elegans (c elegans)) to carry out my work.
Dr. Jeffery Talbot, PhD
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
702-968-1674
jtalbot@roseman.edu
Jeff Talbot, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Assistant Dean for Research and Faculty Development received a B.S. in Biochemistry from the University of Nevada before earning a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He later served as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Pharmacology at the University of Michigan Medical School. Most recently, Dr. Talbot served as an Assistant/Associate Professor at the Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy. His research focuses on the discovery and development of psychiatric drugs targeting substance abuse and mood disorders.
Selected Publications
(Student trainees underlined)

  • Zoladz PR, Kalchik AE, Hoffman MM, Aufdenkampe RL, Lyle SM, Peters DM, Brown CM, Cadle CE, Scharf AR, Daily AM, Wolters NE, Talbot JN, and Rorabaugh BR. (2014)  ADRA2B deletion variant selectively predicts stress-induced enhancement of long-term memory in females. Psychoneuroendocrinology 48:111
  • Zoladz PR, Peters DM, Kalchik AE, Hoffman MM, Aufdenkampe RL, Wolters NE, Woelke SA, and Talbot JN. (2014)  Brief, pre-learning stress reduces false memory production and enhances true memory selectively in females. Physiology and Behavior 128:270
  • Zoladz PR, Kalchik AE, Hoffman MM, Aufdenkampe RL, Burke H, Woelke S, Pisansky J, and Talbot JN. (2014)  Brief, pre-retrieval stress differentially influences long-term memory depending on sex and cortisol response. Brain and Cognition 85:277
  • Zoladz PR, Burke H, Robinson C, Woelke S, Wentz B, Pisansky J, McKay J, Dexter K, and Talbot JN. (2013) Blunted corticosterone response to acute predator stress results in long-term spatial memory impairment. SOJ Psychology 1(1):7
  • Burke H, Robinson C, Wentz B, McKay J, Dexter K, Pisansky J, Talbot JN, andZoladz PR.  Sex-specific impairment of spatial memory following a reminder of predator stress. (2013)  Stress 16(4):496
  • Kisor DF, Talbot JN, Stockert AE, and Smith A. (2013)  A Laboratory Model of Pharmacogenetics as Applied to Clinical Decision Making.  Innovations in Pharmacy 4(2):1
  • Zoladz PR, Warnecke AJ, Woelke SA, Burke H, Frigo RM, Pisansky JM, Sarah M. Lyle and Talbot JN. (2013) Pre-learning stress that is temporally removed from acquisition exerts sex-specific effects on long-term memory.  Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 100:77
  • Nolan TL, Lapinsky DJ, Talbot JN, Indarte M, Liu Y, Manepalli S, Geffert LM, Amos ME, Taylor PN, Madura JD, and Surratt CK. (2011) Identification of a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor by coupling monoamine transporter-based virtual screening and rational molecular hybridization.  ACS Chemical Neuroscience 2(9):544
  • Waterson RE, Kaur K, Talbot JN, Neubig RR, and Rorabaugh BR.  (2011) Gαi2-mediated protection from ischemic injury is modulated by endogenous RGS Proteins in the mouse heart.  Cardiovascular Research 91(1):45
  • Zoladz PR, Clark B, Warnecke A, Smith L, Tabar J, and Talbot JN. (2011) Pre-learning stress differentially affects long-term memory for emotional words, depending on temporal proximity to the learning experience.  Physiology & Behavior 103(5):467
  • *From the CoverTalbot JN, JutkiewiczEM, Graves SM, Clemans CF, Nicol MR, Huang X, Mortensen RM, Neubig RR, and Traynor JR. (2010) RGS inhibition selectively potentiates serotonin-mediated antidepressant effects. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 107(24):11086
  • *In this Issue:  Gene variant may produce antidepressant effects (2010) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 107(24):10767
  • Talbot JN, Roman DL, Clark MJ, Roof RA, Tesmer JJ, Neubig RR, and Traynor JR. (2010) Differential modulation of mu-opioid receptor signaling to adenylyl cyclase by RGS proteins 4 or 8 and 7 in permeabilized C6 cells is Gα subtype dependent.  Journal of Neurochemistry 112(4):1026

Affiliations

  • American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
  • American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Awards & Honors

  • 2009-2013: Bower, Bennett, & Bennett Endowed Chair
  • 2007-2013: Mortar Board Favorite Professor
  • 2012: Rho Chi – Pharmacy Academic Honor Society
  • 2010: Ohio Magazine Excellence in Education Award
  • 2010: Outstanding Professor – Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, ONU
  • 2008: Phi Lambda Sigma – Pharmacy Leadership Society
  • 2008: American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) New Investigator Award
  • 2007: Bower, Bennett, & Bennett Endowed Chair
  • 2006: ASPET Board of Publications Trustees Young Scientist Travel Award
  • Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Recent Research Grants

  • Completed
    • Talbot (PI) – 2012 Bower, J. Bennett, H. Bennett Endowed Chair, ONU
      RGS4 as a regulator of the antidepressant effects of SSRIs($12,000)
    • Talbot (Co-I) – 2012 Community Pharmacy Foundation
      Collaborative Management of Pharmacogenomic Interactions in a Community Pharmacy ($22,000)
    • Talbot (PI) – 2011 Bower, J. Bennett, H. Bennett Endowed Chair, ONU
      RGS4 as a regulator of the antidepressant effects of SSRIs($10,475)
    • Talbot (PI) – 2010 Bower, J. Bennett, H. Bennett Endowed Chair, ONU
      Enhanced antidepressant activity of the 5HT1A receptor in RGS-insensitive mice($12,500)
    • Talbot (PI) – 2009 Bower, J. Bennett, H. Bennett Endowed Chair, ONU
      Enhanced antidepressant activity of the 5HT1A receptor in RGS-insensitive mice($12,500)
    • Talbot (co-PI) – 2009 Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy and Office for Academic Affairs, Ghana: Pharmacy exchange agreement and international student recruiting opportunities ($8,325)
    • Talbot (PI) – 2008 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy New Investigator Program, Separating Analgesia from Abuse Liability by Deletion of RGS Protein Activity ($10,000)
    • Talbot (PI) – 2007 Bower, J. Bennett, H. Bennett Endowed Chair, ONU, Opioid drug activity in mice lacking RGS protein regulation ($11,800)

Presentations & Abstracts

  • Rise of the rapids: The future of rapid-acting antidepressants.  A Symposium on Substance Abuse and Depression. Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV, March 18th, 2015.
  • Towards novel antidepressants with combined rapid and sustained effects: in vitro and in vivo evidence. Manchester University College of Pharmacy, Ft. Wayne, IN, March 5th, 2015.
  • Evidence for combined glutamatergic and monoaminergic actions of a novel rapid antidepressant discovered via virtual screening.  University of Nebraska Medical Center, Dept. of Pharmacology, Omaha, NE, October 10, 2014.
  • Rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects of a novel, dual acting glutamatergic and monoaminergic agent. University of Nevada Las Vegas, Dept. of Psychology, Las Vegas, NV October 1, 2014.
  • Expert Panelist – Moving Nevada toward a sustainable future: a transdisciplinary approach to public health.  Nevada Public Health Association, Las Vegas, NV September 25, 2014
  • The business of psychiatric drug discovery: Commercial successes and mechanistic failures.  Roseman University of Health Sciences MBA Program, Henderson, NV  September 9, 2014
  • Feeling Better Fast: A novel monoamine reuptake inhibitor with rapid and sustained antidepressant effects.  Touro University Nevada, Dept. of Basic Sciences, Henderson, NV  March 5, 2014
  • Discovery and characterization of a novel triple reuptake inhibitor with rapid and chronic antidepressant properties.  Ferris State University College of Pharmacy, Big Rapids, MI November 5, 2013
  • Ascent.  Ohio Northern University, Last Lecture Series – Mortar Board National College Honor Society, Ada, OH May 1, 2013
  • RGS Proteins as regulators of mood and depression.  Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, Henderson, NV November 26, 2012
  • Pharmacogenetics: the promise of personalized medicine.  The Ohio State University, Central Ohio Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Columbus, OH November 13, 2012
  • Pharmacogenetics of asthma: new and alternative medications.  The Ohio State University, Ohio Asthma Coalition Education and Research Conference, Columbus, OH October 5, 2012
  • Understanding addiction (through your teenager’s brain).  Allen County Ohio Bar Association Continuing Legal Education, Lima, OH  October 4, 2012
  • The role of RGS proteins in regulating mood and depression.  Duquesne University, National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Research Program, Pittsburgh, PA  June 1, 2012
  • Expanding pharmacy abroad.  Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology School of Pharmacy, Kumasi, Ghana  May 24, 2012
  • Rise of the rapids: The future of rapid-acting antidepressants.  A Symposium on Substance Abuse and Depression. Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV, March 18th, 2015.
  • Towards novel antidepressants with combined rapid and sustained effects: in vitro and in vivo evidence. Manchester University College of Pharmacy, Ft. Wayne, IN, March 5th, 2015.
  • Evidence for combined glutamatergic and monoaminergic actions of a novel rapid antidepressant discovered via virtual screening. University of Nebraska Medical Center, Dept. of Pharmacology, Omaha, NE, October 10, 2014.
  • Rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects of a novel, dual acting glutamatergic and monoaminergic agent. University of Nevada Las Vegas, Dept. of Psychology, Las Vegas, NV October 1, 2014.
  • Expert Panelist – Moving Nevada toward a sustainable future: a transdisciplinary approach to public health.  Nevada Public Health Association, Las Vegas, NV September 25, 2014
  • The business of psychiatric drug discovery: Commercial successes and mechanistic failures.  Roseman University of Health Sciences MBA Program, Henderson, NV  September 9, 2014
  • Feeling Better Fast: A novel monoamine reuptake inhibitor with rapid and sustained antidepressant effects.  Touro University Nevada, Dept. of Basic Sciences, Henderson, NV  March 5, 2014
  • Discovery and characterization of a novel triple reuptake inhibitor with rapid and chronic antidepressant properties.  Ferris State University College of Pharmacy, Big Rapids, MI November 5, 2013
  • Ascent.  Ohio Northern University, Last Lecture Series – Mortar Board National College Honor Society, Ada, OH May 1, 2013
  • RGS Proteins as regulators of mood and depression.  Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, Henderson, NV November 26, 2012
  • Pharmacogenetics: the promise of personalized medicine.  The Ohio State University, Central Ohio Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Columbus, OH November 13, 2012
  • Pharmacogenetics of asthma: new and alternative medications.  The Ohio State University, Ohio Asthma Coalition Education and Research Conference, Columbus, OH October 5, 2012
  • Understanding addiction (through your teenager’s brain).  Allen County Ohio Bar Association Continuing Legal Education, Lima, OH  October 4, 2012
  • The role of RGS proteins in regulating mood and depression.  Duquesne University, National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Research Program, Pittsburgh, PA  June 1, 2012
  • Expanding pharmacy abroad.  Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology School of Pharmacy, Kumasi, Ghana  May 24, 2012

Posters

  • Nielsen CL, Shirvani B, Baun A, Mao Y, DeVilbiss J, Nyangau LA, Chung L, Jorvig JE, Neubig RR, Traynor JR, and Talbot JN.  RGS4 differentially regulates antidepressant and locomotor behaviors in vivo (2015) The FASEB Journal, 28, Abstract #618.11
  • Kalchik AE, Hoffman MM, Aufdenkampe RL, Lyle SM, Peters DM, Brown CM, Cadle CE, Scharf AR, Dailey AM, Talbot JN, Rorabaugh BR, & Zoladz PR. ADRA2B deletion variant selectively predicts stress-induced enhancement of long-term memory in females. (2015) Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 39, Abstract #834.11
  • Talbot JN, Geffert LR, Wolters NE, Amos ME, Munro CA, Dallman E, Tanda G, Katz JL, Indarte M, Madura JD, Surratt CK.  A novel triple reuptake inhibitor with rapid antidepressant properties identified by virtual screening (2014) The FASEB Journal, 27, Abstract #1141.1.
  • Talbot JN, Wolters NE, Dallman E, Munro CA, Amos ME, Rorabaugh BR, Neubig RR, and Traynor JR. The influence of RGS4 in animal models of mood and depression (2013) 4th G Protein-Coupled Receptor Colloquium, Abstract #78.
  • Burke H, Robinson C, Wentz B, McKay J, Dexter K, Pisansky J, Talbot JN, and Zoladz PR.   Sex-Specific impairment of spatial memory following a reminder of predator stress (2012)   Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 37, Abstract #774.16
  • Zoladz PR, Burke H, Robinson C, Woelke SA, Wentz B, Pisansky J, McKay J, Dexter K, and Talbot JN. Blunted corticosterone response to acute predator stress results in long-term spatial memory impairment (2012) Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 37, Abstract #774.17
  • Warnecke AJ, Burke H, Frigo R, Pisansky J, Woelke SA, Holcomb E, Talbot JN, and Zoladz PR.   Pre-learning stress selectively impairs long-term memory in males who exhibit a robust cortisol response to stress (2012) Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 37, Abstract #797.05
  • Woelke SA, Burke H, Pisansky J, Hoffman M, Aufdenkampe R, Kalchik A, Talbot JN, and Zoladz PR.   Brief, pre-retrieval stress selectively impairs long-term memory in males who exhibit a reduced cortisol response to stress (2012) Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 37, Abstract #797.06
  • Amos ME, Binkey AE, Taylor PN, Rorabaugh BR, Neubig RR, Traynor JR, and Talbot JN.  RGS4 as a regulator of the antidepressant effects of SSRIs (2012) The FASEB Journal, 25, Abstract #1045.6.
  • Taylor PN, Jensen KA, Rorabaugh BR, Neubig RR, Traynor JR, and Talbot JN.  A role for RGS4 in the regulation of the antidepressant effects of SSRIs. (2011) 21st Neuropharmacology Conference: Anxiety and Depression, Abstract #83
  • Nolan TL, Lapinsky DJ, Talbot JN, Indarte M, Liu Y, Manepalli S, Geffert LM, Amos ME, Taylor PN, Madura JD, Surratt CK.  Development of a novel SSRI via structure-based virtual screening and rational molecular hybridization.  (2011)  21st Neuropharmacology Conference: Anxiety and Depression, Abstract #55
  • Talbot JN,Tanda G, Katz JL, Indarte M, Mereu M, Madura JD, and Surratt CK.  Preclinical antidepressant and antipsychostimulant properties of a novel triple reuptake inhibitor lead compound identified via virtual screening. (2011) 21st Neuropharmacology Conference: Anxiety and Depression, Abstract #20
  • Nolan TL, Lapinsky DJ, Talbot JN, Indarte M, Liu Y, Manepalli S, Geffert LM, Amos ME, Taylor PN, Madura JD, Surratt CK.  Discovery of a novel SSRI from a lead compound identified by in silico screening.  (2011)  College on Problems of Drug Dependence, 73, Abstract #524
  • Surratt CK, Indarte M, Madura JD, and Talbot JN.  Preclinical antipsychostimulant and antidepressant properties of a monoamine transporter ligand identified via in silico screening.  (2011)  College on Problems of Drug Dependence, 73, Abstract #699
  • Mabe N, Thompson CG, Waterson RE, Kaur K, Talbot JN, Neubig RR, and Rorabaugh BR.  Inhibition of Gαi2-RGS protein interactions protect the heart from ischemic injury.  (2011)  The FASEB Journal, 24, Abstract #1085.3.
  • Talbot JN, Taylor PN, Jensen KA, Amos ME, Neubig RR, Traynor JR (2011) RGS insensitivity promotes enhanced antidepressant effects of SSRIs.  RGS & AGS Proteins in Physiology and Disease, Abstract #38.
Depression
Rapid-acting antidepressant
RGS proteins
Serotonin
Ketamine
Current Research Interests
We have identified a new antidepressant-like drug, designated MI-4, through a recently developed process called “virtual screening” where computer modeling is used to predict how drugs will act in the body at the molecular level.  Further laboratory testing revealed that MI-4 increased levels of several naturally occurring chemicals that are considered to be key in the treatment of depression, namely dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin.  Furthermore, MI-4 produced antidepressant-like effects in animals similar to the commonly used antidepressant drug Prozac.  However, unlike Prozac, the antidepressant-like effects of MI-4 were both rapid (observed within 3 days) and sustained (observed after 21-day).  MI-4 also helped increase resistance to the depression-inducing effects of stress.  Importantly, MI-4 was also found to be non-addictive in both behavioral and neurological models.  This work suggests MI-4 may represent a new class of compounds with the potential to produce both rapid and chronic antidepressant effects.
Dr. Venkata Yellepeddi, BPharm, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Pharmacy
801-878-1096
vyellepeddi@roseman.edu
Dr. Venkata Kashyap Yellepeddi obtained his Bachelor of Pharmacy degree from Kakatiya University, India in 2002. He later graduated with a PhD in Medical Sciences with a specialization in Pharmaceutics from Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas in 2011. Dr. Yellepeddi joined the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology in 2003 and worked as a Senior Research Fellow for three years. He was involved in research projects related to drug delivery, drug targeting, pre-clinical toxicology and pharmacokinetics. During his tenure as a Senior Research Fellow, he mentored students on various aspects of pharmaceutical research as part of an Indo-French student exchange program. After enrolling in a graduate program in 2006, Dr. Yellepeddi conducted a National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute-funded research project on drug targeting to ovarian cancer using novel nanomaterials. He was also actively involved in the development of multifunctional nanodevices for treatment and resistance reversal in various cancers, nonviral gene delivery, synthesis and characterization of biopolymers, enhancement of oral permeability for drugs with poor biopharmaceutical properties and clinical pharmacokinetics of nanotechnology based formulations. Dr. Yellepeddi joined College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences in 2012. Dr. Yellepeddi was also appointed as Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Utah in 2012. Dr. Yellepeddi served as visiting professor for teaching pharmaceutics course at Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M University-Health Science Center, College Station, Texas. Dr. Yellepeddi published 16 original research publications, 4 book chapters, one book review and 22 abstracts at international conferences. Dr. Yellepeddi currently serves as a scientific reviewer for 21 scientific journals and serves as editorial board member for one journal. Dr. Yellepeddi after joining Roseman University, received three extramural grants from both non-profit foundations and private organizations.
Curriculum Vitae
Publications & Presentations

  • Clinical pharmacokinetics of inhaled antimicrobials.Stockmann C, Roberts JK, Yellepeddi VK, Sherwin CM. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2015 May;54(5):473-92. doi: 10.1007/s40262-015-0250-x. PMID: 25735634
  • Punctal plug: a medical device to treat dry eye syndrome and for sustained drug delivery to the eye. Yellepeddi VK, Sheshala R, McMillan H, Gujral C, Jones D, Raghu Raj Singh T. Drug Discov Today. 2015 Jul;20(7):884-9. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2015.01.013. Epub 2015 Feb 7. Review. PMID: 25668579
  • Comparative evaluation of small-molecule chemosensitizers in reversal of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Yellepeddi VK, Vangara KK, Kumar A, Palakurthi S. Anticancer Res. 2012 Sep;32(9):3651-8. PMID: 22993302
  • Recent trends in cancer drug resistance reversal strategies using nanoparticles. Palakurthi S, Yellepeddi VK, Vangara KK. Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2012 Mar;9(3):287-301. doi: 10.1517/17425247.2012.665365. Review. PMID: 22339554
  • Biotinylated PAMAM dendrimers for intracellular delivery of cisplatin to ovarian cancer: role of SMVT. Yellepeddi VK, Kumar A, Maher DM, Chauhan SC, Vangara KK, Palakurthi S. Anticancer Res. 2011 Mar;31(3):897-906. PMID: 21498711
  • Mechanism of gene transfection by polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with ornithine residues. Kumar A, Yellepeddi VK, Vangara KK, Strychar KB, Palakurthi S. J Drug Target. 2011 Nov;19(9):770-80. doi: 10.3109/1061186X.2011.568061. Epub 2011 Apr 4. PMID: 21457075
  • Enhanced gene transfection efficiency by polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with ornithine residues. Kumar A, Yellepeddi VK, Davies GE, Strychar KB, Palakurthi S. Int J Pharm. 2010 Jun 15;392(1-2):294-303. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2010.03.054. Epub 2010 Apr 2. PMID: 20363307
  • Biotinylated poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers as carriers for drug delivery to ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Yellepeddi VK, Kumar A, Palakurthi S. Anticancer Res. 2009 Aug;29(8):2933-43.
  • Permeability of surface-modified polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pisal DS, Yellepeddi VK, Kumar A, Kaushik RS, Hildreth MB, Guan X, Palakurthi S. Int J Pharm. 2008 Feb 28;350(1-2):113-21. Epub 2007 Aug 26. PMID 17913410
    Yellepeddi VK, Kumar A, Palakurthi S. Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2009 Aug;6(8):835-50. doi: 10.1517/17425240903061251. Review. PMID: 19637972
  • Surface modified poly(amido)amine dendrimers as diverse nanomolecules for biomedical applications. Yellepeddi VK, Kumar A, Palakurthi S. Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2009 Aug;6(8):835-50. doi: 10.1517/17425240903061251. Review. PMID: 19637972

Recent Research Grants

  • Smith Rexall Drug Company, 2015,  For the proposal “Potency and Stability Studies of Compounded Formulations”. ($8000; Grant Duration – Mar 2015 to Mar 2016).
  • American Association of College of Pharmacy, New Investigator Award, 2013. For the proposal “Omega-3 Fatty Acid Nanoconstructs for Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel”. ($10,000; Grant Duration – Jan 2013 to Jan 2014).
  • International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists Foundation, Research Grant, 2013, for proposal “Formulation and Stability Studies of a Preservative Free Prochlorperazine Nasal Spray for Pain Relief in Migraine”. ($9500; Grant Duration – Feb 2013 to Feb 2014).

Awards & Honors

  • American Association of College of Pharmacy (AACP), New Investigator Award, 2013.
  • International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists (IACP), Research Award, 2013.
  • First Place, Poster Presentation, College of Pharmacy Research Colloquium, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, 2010.
  • Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Equivalency Certification (FPGEC), National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, 2009.
  • Travel Award from School of Graduate Studies, South Dakota State University for attending American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting, San Diego, 2007.
  • First Place, Ph.D. proposal, Graduate Research Awards, Sigma Xi Chapter, South Dakota State University.
  • Faculty Mentor For: Fund the Future Scholarship for the Compounders on Capitol Hill 2014 (Angela Yuen-P3 Student), IACP Foundation Student Essay Competition Winner (Prisca Umeh-P3 Student)

Memberships & Appointments

  • Chair-elect, 2016, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)-Rocky Mountain Discussion Group.
  • Steering committee member, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists(AAPS) – Targeted Drug Delivery Focus Group, 2013-present.
  • Member, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)
  • Member, Controlled Release Society (CRS)
  • Member, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)
  • Member, International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists (IACP)
  • Member, Academy of Health Science Educators (ASHE), University of Utah

Additional Links

Nanotechnology
Cancer
Migraine
Pharmacokientics
Formulations
Current Research Interests/Projects
My research focuses primarily on developing nanotechnology-based formulations for targeting therapeutics to tumors. My research also focuses on the development and pharmacokinetic evaluation of formulations to overcome various physiological barriers (nasal, periodontal, skin, corneal etc.). In my lab, we are developing various nanotechnology-based delivery systems to target drugs/macromolecules to resistant-tumors, to overcome the blood-brain barrier in diseases like migraine and cerebral palsy, and to overcome gastrointestinal epithelial barrier. The other areas of my research interests include population pharmacokinetics and modeling of drugs used in special populations; formulation and evaluation of sterile and non-sterile extemporaneously compounded preparations; biopharmaceutic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of new chemical entities (NCE’s); and development of technology-based visual aids for the teaching pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics. In our lab, we are currently working on the following research projects:

  1. Omega-3 fatty acid conjugated dendrimers for targeting paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells.
  2. Dequalinium-coated PLGA nanoparticles for mitochondrial delivery of paclitaxel.
  3. Preservative-free prochlorperazine nasal spray for treatment of migraine.
  4. Microfluidic-chip based biorelevant dissolution device for evaluation of locally delivered periodontal formulations.
  5. Development of oral pediatric formulation of dendrimer-n-acetyl cysteine for treatment of cerebral palsy in neonates.
  6. Potency and stability evaluation of various compounded preparations.
  7. Population pharmacokinetics of Amikacin in pediatric oncology patients.
  8. Development of animated-videos as visual aids for teaching pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics courses to Pharm.D students.