The University utilizes a “block” system of curricular design, which provides students with the opportunity to study only one content area at a time for a condensed time period, rather than taking several concurrent courses spread out over a semester. By using a variety of educational strategies, faculty can help students achieve the learning objectives for each block. The program does not award students traditional letter grades (e.g., A, B). Instead students must demonstrate competency by successfully passing the assessment (examination) that is associated with each block. The program also offers a unique experiential training program that places students in a community pharmacy practice setting within the first two weeks after beginning classes at Roseman.

The curriculum of Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy PharmD program can be divided into two major components: the didactic (classroom) component, and the experiential component.

The didactic component of the curriculum consists primarily of classroom experiences in the first two professional years (P1 and P2). Each content area (or each block) varies in duration and is allotted as much time as necessary. The experiential component begins in the P1 year and is integrated into all three professional years.

Didactic Curriculum (P1 Year)

The first professional year (P1) consists of 14 sequential blocks and two additional courses which are distributed throughout the P1 year.

PHAR 410 Fundamentals of Drug Action and Metabolism
A study of the composition and structure of proteins, classification of enzymes and coenzymes, enzyme kinetics and regulation, drug biotransformation, drug receptor properties, structural features of drugs, functional group properties and receptor interactions, fundamentals of pattern recognition that relate chemical structure to pharmacological action, drug dose response curves, membrane structure and transport, and mechanisms of signal transduction.

PHAR 411 Fundamentals of Molecular Biology and Pharmacogenomics
A study of the basic concepts of mammalian biochemistry including the biosynthesis of proteins, nucleic acid structure and function in gene expression at the cellular level in both normal and disease states.  Additionally, there is a review of nucleotide metabolism, an introduction to the pharmacology of antineoplastic agents and an introduction to pharmacogenomics.

PHAR 412 Metabolism of Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Amino Acids
A study of the basic concepts and principles of mammalian biochemistry including the digestion, absorption, biosynthesis and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids at the cellular level in both the normal and disease states. The principles of energy transformations are also studied.

PHAR 413 Hematology and Immunology
A study of basic hematology and immunology and the fundamental principles related to clinical immunology.

PHAR 414 Drug Information and Literature Evaluation I

A study of the practice of drug information, drug literature evaluation and searching, principles of evidence-based medicine, medical writing, medication safety, and pharmacovigilance.

PHAR 420 Neuropharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry
This block introduces basic concepts of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry particularly as applied to the autonomic and central nervous system.  In this block, a study of the basic principles of drug action is presented for specific drug classes including: the chemical properties, mechanisms of drug action, routes of administration, clinical uses, disposition, contraindications, adverse reactions, clinically significant drug interactions, and drug disease interaction.

PHAR 421 Cardiovascular, Renal, and Pulmonary Systems: Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry
This block introduces basic concepts of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry particularly as applied to the cardiovascular, renal and pulmonary systems.  In this block, a study of the basic principles of drug action is presented for specific drug classes including: the chemical properties, mechanisms of drug action, routes of administration, clinical uses, disposition, contraindications, adverse reactions, clinically significant drug interactions, and drug disease interaction.

PHAR 422 Gastrointestinal, Genitourinary and Skeletal Muscle: Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry
This block introduces basic concepts of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry particularly as applied to gastrointestinal, genitourinary and skeletal muscle systems. In this block, a study of the basic principles of drug action is presented for specific drug classes including: the chemical properties, mechanisms of drug action, routes of administration, clinical uses, disposition, contraindications, adverse reactions, clinically significant drug interactions, and drug disease interaction.

PHAR 423 Endocrine Systems: Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry
This block introduces basic concepts of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry as applied to the endocrine system.  In this block, a study of the basic principles of drug action is presented for each specific drug class including: the chemical properties, mechanisms of drug action, routes of administration, clinical uses, disposition, contraindications, adverse reactions, clinically significant drug interactions, and drug disease interaction.

PHAR 424 Antimicrobial Pharmacology and Fundamentals of Toxicology
An overview of fundamental principles of antimicrobial therapy and the basic pharmacology of antimicrobial agents along with a study of the basic principles of toxicology along with an introduction to clinical toxicology.

PHAR 430 Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics
A study of the application of physical and chemical principles to the development, preparation, and stabilization of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Also included is a study of biological and physicochemical factors that influence the availability of a drug from a dosage form and the subsequent disposition and response of the drug in the body.

PHAR 431 Pharmacokinetics
The application of the concepts of biopharmaceutics and kinetics to the rational design of individualized drug dosage regimens, taking into consideration such factors as hepatic and renal impairment.

PHAR 440 Pharmacy Administration
A study of the history of pharmacy, the role of pharmacy in the US health care system, and the laws that have shaped contemporary pharmacy practice.

PHAR 441 Pharmacy Law
A study of the basic provisions of State and Federal pharmacy laws and regulations pertaining to pharmacy practice, licensure, controlled substances, poison, legal liabilities, laws and regulations of other health care providers, and pharmacy case law.

PHAR 444 Immunization Provider Certification
Students will complete didactic and skills-based learning on the topic of vaccine-preventable diseases, immunization policies and recommendations, running an immunization service, and practical skills for administering subcutaneous and intramuscular injections. Approximately 8 hours are spent completing a self-study that must be completed prior to the didactic and skills-based portion of the course, which requires an additional 8 – 10 hours.

PHAR 450 Pharmaceutical Calculations
This course (held throughout the P1 year) covers all aspects of pharmaceutical calculations including: fundamentals of measurement and calculation, measurement systems, dosage and concentration units, isotonic solutions, electrolyte solutions, and calculations related to compounding.

PHAR 451 Top 200 Drugs I
This course is offered throughout the first academic (P1) year and focuses on familiarizing students with the 200 most frequently prescribed drugs. For each drug, students will: identify the trade and generic names, identify the labeled indication; identify appropriate administration route, dose, and dosage forms of the drug for adult and pediatric patients; and identify the mechanism of action.

PHAR 452 Self-Care Therapeutics
This course serves as an introductory therapeutics course focused on OTC self-care, complementary and alternative medicines, and nonpharmacologic interventions for medical conditions that are appropriate for pharmacist guided patient self-care.

PHAR 465 Pharmacist Patient Care Process (PPCP) I
This skills based course is offered throughout the first academic (P1) year and strengthens the students’ communication, drug information, and patient care skills.

PHAR 495 Continuing Professional Development
This block is offered throughout the first academic (P1) year and is designed to mentor students through the beginning of their professional development. Students are assigned a faculty mentor who will be their point of contact throughout this course. Throughout the course, the student will build a portfolio that will document their professional development.

Didactic Curriculum (P2 Year)

The didactic portion of the second professional year (P2) consists of 15 sequential blocks, 1 distributed block, Top 200 Drugs and the Scientific Writing assignment.

PHAR 511 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Fluids, Electrolytes and Nephrology
An integrated study of anatomy, patho-physiology, physical and laboratory assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmaco-kinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to fluid homeostasis, electrolyte/mineral balance and major renal diseases.

PHAR 512 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Cardiology
An integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharma-cology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major cardiovascular diseases.

PHAR 513 Clinical Immunology and Ophthalmology
An integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharma-cology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major immune disorders and diseases involving the eye. Also included are concepts pertaining to immunization.

PHAR 514 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Pulmonology
An integrated study of anatomy, patho-physiology, physical assessment, pharma-cology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major lung diseases.

PHAR 515 Therapeutic Disease State Management: GI Disorders
An integrated study of anatomy, patho-physiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmaco-kinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major gastrointestinal disorders.

PHAR 516 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Infectious Disease
A study of the basic principles of antibiotic action including, for each specific antibiotic class, the mechanism of action, routes of administration, disposition, contraindications, adverse reactions, and clinically relevant drug interactions. Also included is an integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major infectious diseases.

PHAR 517 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Hematology/Oncology
A study of the pharmacological principles of chemotherapeutic agents. Also included is an integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to the major neoplastic and hematological diseases.

PHAR 518 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Endocrinology
An integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to endocrinology and endocrine disorders.

PHAR 519 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Psychiatry
An integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major psychiatric disorders.

PHAR 520 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Neurology
An integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major neurological disorders.

PHAR 521 Clinical Nutrition
A study of the pathophysiology, administration, pharmacology, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, use in special populations, and review of pertinent literature as they relate to the practical applications of nutrition therapy.  In addition, optimal nutrition for healthy adults and children will be reviewed.

PHAR 522 Women’s and Men’s Health
An integrated study of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, clinical pharmacokinetics, patient care, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to contraception, gender-specific disease states and/or conditions.

PHAR 525 Therapeutic Disease State Management: Critical Care Management

An integrated study of anatomy, pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, therapeutics, pharmacokinetics, patient care, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of pertinent drug literature as they relate to major diseases that are often associated with critical care medicine. Assimilated into this course will be components of pulmonology, cardiology, and other disciplines of medicine commonly seen in the intensive care setting.

PHAR 540 Drug Information and Literature Evaluation
A study of the practice of drug information, drug literature evaluation and searching, principles of evidence-based medicine, medical writing, medication safety, and pharmacovigilance.

PHAR 541 Pharmacy Administration
A study of the economic, social, and political forces affecting the delivery of health care services.  In addition, the effect of these forces on pharmacy practice and the impact of pharmacy on the health care system are explored. Also included are concepts related to people management skills.

PHAR 550 Top 200 Drugs

This course is offered throughout the second academic (P2) year and focuses on familiarizing students with the 200 most frequently prescribed drugs. This course builds on the objectives of PHAR 451 and assesses students’ ability to identify the mechanism of action, therapeutic dose, contraindications, black box warning, adverse effects, and controlled schedule for each drug.

PHAR 565 Pharmacist Patient Care Process (PPCP) II
This skills based course is offered throughout the second academic (P2) year. This course builds upon the skills developed in PHAR 465 and further strengthens the students’ communication, drug information, and patient care skills.

PHAR 595 Continuing Professional Development
This block is offered throughout the second academic (P2) year and is designed to mentor students through the continuation of their professional development. Students are assigned a faculty mentor who will be their point of contact throughout this course. Throughout the course, the student will continue to build a portfolio that will document their professional development.

Third Professional Year Didactic Curriculum (P3 Year)

PHAR 699 Capstone Course
This course is offered at the end of the third (P3) and final academic year after the students have completed the experiential curriculum.  The course offers 30 hours of classroom instruction that consist of a review of all curricular competencies and prepare the student for licensure examination and entrance into the profession.

EXPERIENTIAL CURRICULUM

The second major component of the PharmD program is its experiential curriculum. During this phase of the curriculum, students are placed in different pharmacy practice settings to learn contemporary pharmacy practice from pharmacist preceptors. The Roseman College of Pharmacy Experiential program is divided into two main categories: Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE-1, IPPE-SC,,IPPE-SI and IPPE-2) and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE). The following provides a short description of student experiences and practice related outcomes.

PHAR 470, 570, 572 & 573

The overarching objective of IPPE is to emphasize the relevance of the didactic curriculum in relationship to contemporary pharmacy practice. Students complete activities/assignments in experiential settings derived by instructors, based on what is being taught in the classroom. These opportunities allow students to observe first-hand the drugs, patients and disease states discussed in class, thus reinforcing didactic learning experiences. The practice-related objectives for IPPE include an array of outcomes that increase in level and intensity with student knowledge, skills, and abilities.

PHAR 470 P1 Community Pharmacy Longitudinal

When: Longitudinal rotation, during the first academic year.

Number of hours: 128

Outcomes: The prescribed outcomes begin with becoming familiar with the practice site, the role and responsibilities of pharmacists and other site personnel, and culminate with the student performing rudimentary aspects of pharmaceutical care. Each preceptor is supplied with a checklist of abilities that the student is expected to demonstrate by the end of the experience. A copy of the checklist is submitted for review by the College at the middle and end of each rotation. Additionally, students complete IPPE related assignments and participate in Professionalism Day and IPPE Seminars.

PHAR 570 P2 Community Pharmacy Longitudinal

When: Longitudinal rotation, during the second academic year.

Number of hours: 144

Outcomes: The learning outcomes build upon those assessed in PHAR 470 and PHAR 472. Each preceptor is supplied with a checklist of abilities that the student is expected to demonstrate by the end of the experience. A copy of the checklist is submitted for review by the College after the middle and at the end of each rotation. Additionally, students complete IPPE related assignments and participate in Professionalism Day and IPPE Seminars.

PHAR 572 IPPE-Summer Community

When: During the summer between the first and second academic year.

Number of Hours: 160 (4 weeks at 40 hours per week minimum)

Outcomes: The outcome expectations for the IPPE Community 4 Week Block experience build on those from IPPE, culminating with the student being able to perform all duties expected of an entry-level pharmacist. Each preceptor is supplied with a checklist of abilities that the student is expected to demonstrate by the end of the experience A copy of the checklist is submitted for review by the College after the middle and at the end of each rotation.

PHAR 573 IPPE-Summer Institutional

When: During the summer between the first and second academic year.

Number of Hours: 80 (2 weeks at 40 hours per week minimum)

Outcomes: The outcome expectations for the IPPE Institutional 2 Week Block experience begin with students being introduced to the distributive and logistical functions of inpatient pharmacy services at a hospital. Additionally, students are exposed to clinical and patient care activities in the institutional setting. Each preceptor is supplied with a checklist of abilities that the student is expected to demonstrate by the end of the experience. A copy of the checklist is submitted for review by the College at the end of each rotation.

PHAR 600 APPE

When: Third academic year

Number of Hours: 1,440 (Six-week rotations; minimum of 40 hrs/week)

Outcomes: In general, the outcome expectations for APPE represent further advancement of student abilities to include the provision of pharmaceutical care and disease state management. Each preceptor is supplied with learning outcomes that the student is expected to demonstrate by the end of the six-week experience. An assessment form of the learning outcomes is submitted for review by the College after the third week and at the end of the rotation. Required APPE Each student must complete each of the following rotations:

PHAR 601 Adult Acute Care

The overall goals of the Adult Acute Care experience are to promote student knowledge, skills and abilities and to effectively participate in the patient care, decision-making process in the inpatient institutional setting. During these experiences the student will have the opportunity to participate in ongoing clinical activities. The student will function as an integral part of the health care team and will gain experience with patient interviewing techniques, patient monitoring, clinical use of drugs, chemical concentrations in biological fluids, and manual and computerized methods for planning dosing regimens. Emphasis will be placed on student’s demonstration and understanding of common disease states and treatment modalities.

PHAR 602 Advanced-Community-Based Medicine

The overall goals of the Advanced Community experience are to promote student knowledge, skills and abilities and effectively participate in the patient care, decision-making process in the community pharmacy setting. Emphasis will be placed on disease state management, the development of professional attitudes and judgment.

PHAR 603 Ambulatory Care

The purpose of this rotation is for students to gain professional skills in an ambulatory care practice environment. The Ambulatory Care rotation affords students the opportunity to effectively participate in the patient care decision-making process. Students will participate in a variety of clinical activities, functioning as an integral member of the healthcare team. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to demonstrate their understanding of common disease states and treatment modalities as well as their ability to provide pharmaceutical care.

PHAR 604 Institutional Practice

The purpose of this rotation is for students to gain professional skills in the distributive functions of pharmaceutical care in the inpatient setting (e.g., prescription orders and order entry, dispensing, record keeping, patient interviewing and counseling, patient profiles/charts, third-party billing, legal requirements, compounding, sterile products, communication with other health care professionals, inventory control and etc.)

Selectives

Selective experiences include all specialty pharmacy practice experiences. Students are required to complete two Selectives. The areas of specialty for these experiences include but are not limited to: drug information, cardiology, critical care, pediatrics, geriatrics, infectious disease, hematology/oncology, surgery, nutrition, and pain management. The number of the different selective experiences may vary annually based on site and preceptor availability.

ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS

Elective courses are typically taken in the P3 year.  Pharmacy practice experiences may also be taken as electives to fulfill the elective requirement.  It is possible to take electives prior to the P3 year with approval of the instructor and the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. Students must have at least P2 status in order to enroll in any elective courses. Available elective courses may be found in the Student Catalog.